Tag Archive: Book Marketing


While it is true, there has been a major decline in physical book sales and a massive upswing in digital or e-books, there is still a very good reason to offer your book in paperback.

While most people will opt to buy your book in the e-book format because it’s cheaper and they get it now instead of waiting for your “real” book to ship to them and with an e-book they also don’t have to pay shipping charges. But they dones’t mean you should ditch offering it in paperback all together. Some people feel it’s not a good book if it doesn’t exist in the other format. It’s a strange yet popular belief that a book isn’t at least available on paperback, then it probably isn’t worth checking out in the first place.

While I agree that may seem strange, there is no explaining the consumer mindset and well, why even try? If offering your book in paperback can help increase your e-book sales, why not do it?

There is also another distinct advantage to doing this, especially with Amazon because they take the list price of your paperback book and then show the e-book version of the book as a discounted price. For example,

Digital List Price: $0.99
Print List Price: $5.97
Kindle Price: $0.99
You Save: $4.98 (83%)

Who doesn’t want to save 83%? I mean come on … that’s a great deal, right? People love bargains and if it looks like you are saving them 10%, 20%, 50% or 83% in this case, it makes them feel like they are getting a good deal and that has been proved time and again by marketing experts as a great sales tool.

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Someone once said that to be a successful author it’s like 10% writing,  90% marketing. This isn’t exactly all that off. I mean think about it … if you are the best writer in the world, how will anybody know if you don’t properly market your book?

That being said, today’s indie author question is, should I use Google Ad Words to promote my book?

Google will allow you to pay them money for every click they send you. So in theory that sounds like a great way to get people to find out about your book, right?

Well in theory, yes it does. But as I said before you should never spend more money than you could possibly make on your book to try and promote it.

As of right this very moment, Google is charging $1.68 (on average) to send a single person to your book sales page. If your book is only selling for say $.99 then how much did that one person just COST you – not _make_ you, but COST you?

And that $1.68 you spent to get that single person to view your book sales page, doesn’t mean they will actually buy your book, it just means they will look at the page. It may take on average about 400 people to view  a page to make a sale. That means at the current going rate of $1.68 a click you’ll have to spend about $672 to make a single sale. I don’t know about you but I could think of a lot of better ways to spend $672.

Of course these numbers are just estimates. Sometimes you can find a keyword that is as low as $1 a click instead of $1.68. Sometimes out of 400 people you’ll get 3 sales instead of just 1. Sometimes those people who don’t have experience in PPC (pay per click) advertising don’t write a good ad word summary and their sales are even worse than 1:400.

So to answer your question, do I think you should use PPC advertising to promote your book? No, I don’t. It’s just not a cost effective method for marketing your book. It’s great for other things, just not for this specific thing.

I got a great question sent in to me this week and it was basically asking me if it was worth their time to submit their book to all those hundreds (probably more like thousands) of book review blogs. Does it really help sales?

The answer is yes, they actually do help in sales.

Although there is no scientific formula and not every book review blog is going to be as good as the next. But assuming you have a decent enough book, with proper editing, and a well done cover, then you can roughly guesstimate about 10 sales per blog you get your book listed on.

Some obviously will be better and you’ll find your sales surge up 50 or by 100, but that’s a rare occurrence. Most of the blogs don’t get that much traffic so you’ll have to spend a lot of time making your submissions but in the end you’ll find it worth it.

When to comes to marketing your book you need to look at the numbers. You should never spend more than you could make. So let’s review the math …. A review on a book blog cost you $0 and in turn makes you about 10 sales. So you tell me, isn’t it worth at least 10 sales (maybe as many as 50 to 100) to submit your book for free?