Tag Archive: Literature


This is a subject that drives me up a wall. I hate when I am reading a book and I start to hear the same words over and over. To me it’s just lazy writing and a sign of really bad editing.

Using the same a few times is common in your first draft. But by the time your book gets published you shouldn’t have the issue.

Your character walks to their car, gets in their car, and then drives their car. How many times do you really need to say car? It’s annoying and distracts the reader.

Out of the last 20 romance novels I’ve read this year, at least 15 of them had them problem and all but one of them were from real publishers, not indie’s.

So how did that even happen? I think (and again this is just my theory) that writers get it in their head that if they get an agent and a “real” publishing deal, that the publishers will take full responsibility for every little bit of editing your book, but in the end it is your book with your name on it, so you can’t leave it up to someone else.

The best thing you could ever do is to HEAR your words. Sometimes hearing your written words spoken out loud, will help you spot mistakes you just don’t notice when reading it. What I do is use a TTS (text to speech) program on my iphone called Voice Dream. I think I paid $1.99 for the app. I load up my entire word document and then have it read it back to me, chapter my chapter. I close my eyes and just listen.

If you don’t do this for your book then you are making a huge mistake. While your publisher will no doubt do their best, it is still your book and you want it to be perfect, right?

SO STOP REPEATING WORDS. Seriously. You don’t need to say door 3 times in a single paragraph.

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NA romance stands for new adult romance, just as YA romance stands for young adult romance.

While young adult romance covers those teenagers (or young adults) in love, NA or new adult romance novels covers those who are typically a bit older, as in legal age (18) but still new to adult hood, so under 25. Usually those who are in college, not yet out there experiencing the real world and still figuring out their lives.

New Adult isn’t about young adults having explicit sexual encounters because there are quite a few NA romance novels without those. No it’s more about a classification of age. Young Adult = 18 and Under. New Adult = 18 to 25 (or so).

But again keep in mind there aren’t any hard and fast rules and it could vary from story to story, author to author. In the end it’s really just a marketing classification. A way for retailers and book bloggers to easily classify material for the type of reading it includes.

Oh and for the record, someone else asked me this recently too…. HEA means Happily Ever After. Most people who read romance novels expect them to have a HEA or happily ever after. It sort of defines the romance genre. Life can suck in your book, you can brutalize your character but in the end, most people who read romance novels of any sub-genre usually want that happily ever after.

How to be a successful author

So you want to be a successful author? That’s great. But the only way you can really do this is to … WRITE! I know that sounds to simple, but it’s true. The more work you have out there, the more likely you are to be noticed and gain new fans.

Write a series of short stories and offer them for free. How many stories do you need? Well there is no set number but there is no reason not to release several stories this year. When you finish each story and they are with the editor getting your final spelling / grammar checks you can be on your social networking sites promoting the story that will be released soon.

Being a successful author is about building your brand. To build your brand than you need to get out there and be seen.

In every book do you provide a way for your fans to find you? Do you include links to your Facebook page, your Twitter and Google+ account? Do you tweet often and post updates on your Facebook and Google+ account at least 2 or 3 times a week?  If you build up a big following, every time you release a new book, you can send out an update and get instant sales!

I got a great question sent in to me this week and it was basically asking me if it was worth their time to submit their book to all those hundreds (probably more like thousands) of book review blogs. Does it really help sales?

The answer is yes, they actually do help in sales.

Although there is no scientific formula and not every book review blog is going to be as good as the next. But assuming you have a decent enough book, with proper editing, and a well done cover, then you can roughly guesstimate about 10 sales per blog you get your book listed on.

Some obviously will be better and you’ll find your sales surge up 50 or by 100, but that’s a rare occurrence. Most of the blogs don’t get that much traffic so you’ll have to spend a lot of time making your submissions but in the end you’ll find it worth it.

When to comes to marketing your book you need to look at the numbers. You should never spend more than you could make. So let’s review the math …. A review on a book blog cost you $0 and in turn makes you about 10 sales. So you tell me, isn’t it worth at least 10 sales (maybe as many as 50 to 100) to submit your book for free?

This is not one of those ethical conversations about the merits of buying a book review. There are more than enough sites that debate this subject to death.

This article is to answer the question, “How do you buy a book review?” And the answer is simple  … there is pretty much nothing you can’t buy at http://www.Fiverr.com for $5.

Fiverr was started in 2009 and has become the largest market place for all  kind of things for $5.  There really isn’t much you can’t get there including book reviews, positive ratings on book review sites and more.

So there you have it. Now you know how you can buy a book review.

How simple was that?

With the massive success of 50 Shades of Grey there has been a huge influx of indie published books in the erotic fiction category but that begs the question, in the world of self published fiction, which actually sells better, romance books or erotica?

The answer is ROMANCE and the reason is because sites like Amazon remove “erotica” from their basic search results. So if someone wants to search for an ‘erotic’ novel they have to actually type in the name of the book.

There is a massive erotica market out there, but unless you have a huge budget to market the book yourself, what are you going to do? Of course there are other places to sell your book besides Amazon but in the end we all know that Amazon has become the largest retailer of books.